Emerald Screen: A Glimpse into Films Made in Ireland

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Films Made in Ireland

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From the rugged cliffs of the Wild Atlantic Way to the quaint cobblestone streets of Dublin, Ireland’s enchanting landscapes and rich history have captured the imagination of filmmakers worldwide. Over the decades, the Emerald Isle has not only produced cinematic masterpieces of its own but also played host to international blockbusters.

As the Irish director jim sheridan is a distant cousin, I thought I would take a look at the genre and see what famous movies filmed here incldued. So lets dive into the world of films made in Ireland, where the synergy of storytelling and scenic beauty creates cinematic magic.

Contents show

50 of the Best Irish movies filmed in Ireland

  1. The Quiet Man (1952) – Directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara.
  2. Once (2007) – A musical romance set in Dublin.
  3. My Left Foot (1989) – A biographical drama starring Daniel Day-Lewis.
  4. In the Name of the Father (1993) – Another Day-Lewis film, dealing with the true story of the Guildford Four.
  5. Angela’s Ashes (1999) – Based on Frank McCourt’s memoir.
  6. The Commitments (1991) – A musical comedy-drama about a Dublin soul band.
  7. The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006) – A drama set during the Irish War of Independence.
  8. Brooklyn (2015) – A period drama about an Irish immigrant in 1950s New York.
  9. Michael Collins (1996) – A biographical film about the irish revolutionary michael collins, irish independence and the irish civil war.
  10. Song of the Sea (2014) – An animated fantasy inspired by Irish folklore.
  11. Calvary (2014) – A black comedy drama.
  12. The Field (1990) – A drama starring Richard Harris.
  13. The Secret of Roan Inish (1994) – A family drama centered on Irish folklore.
  14. The Guard (2011) – A black comedy crime film.
  15. Intermission (2003) – A comedic crime drama.
  16. Philomena (2013) – A drama inspired by true events.
  17. The Crying Game (1992) – A drama with a twist.
  18. Ondine (2009) – A romantic drama infused with Irish myth.
  19. Hunger (2008) – A historical drama about Bobby Sands.
  20. Sing Street (2016) – A musical coming-of-age comedy-drama.
  21. The Magdalene Sisters (2002) – A drama about the Magdalene laundries in Ireland.
  22. Into the West (1992) – A family adventure film.
  23. Leap Year (2010) – A romantic comedy set in Ireland.
  24. The Siege of Jadotville (2016) – A war film about Irish soldiers.
  25. Waking Ned Devine (1998) – A comedy set in a small Irish village.
  26. The Lobster (2015) – A dystopian black comedy.
  27. The Snapper (1993) – A comedy based on a Roddy Doyle novel.
  28. A Date for Mad Mary (2016) – A drama about a woman released from prison.
  29. Frank (2014) – A comedic drama set in Ireland and other locales.
  30. Evelyn (2002) – A drama based on real events in the 1950s.
  31. Bloody Sunday (2002) – A drama about the 1972 Derry massacre.
  32. Breakfast on Pluto (2005) – A drama set in the 1970s.
  33. The Boxer (1997) – A drama starring Daniel Day-Lewis.
  34. Circle of Friends (1995) – A drama set in 1950s Ireland.
  35. War of the Buttons (1994) – A drama about feuding Irish kids.
  36. The Van (1996) – A comedy based on a novel by Roddy Doyle.
  37. Some Mother’s Son (1996) – Based on the 1981 prison hunger strike.
  38. The Young Offenders (2016) – A comedy about two teenage boys.
  39. Man About Dog (2004) – An Irish comedy.
  40. The Stag (2013) – A comedy about a bachelor party.
  41. A Man of No Importance (1994) – A drama set in 1960s Dublin.
  42. Five Minutes of Heaven (2009) – A drama dealing with the aftermath of violence.
  43. Black ’47 (2018) – A historical drama set during the Great Famine.
  44. The Hole in the Ground (2019) – A horror film.
  45. Garage (2007) – A drama about a lonely man in rural Ireland.
  46. The Bachelor Weekend (2013) – A comedy about a stag weekend.
  47. Dancing at Lughnasa (1998) – A drama starring Meryl Streep.
  48. The Delinquent Season (2018) – A drama about two couples in suburban Dublin.
  49. Adam & Paul (2004) – A gritty drama about drug addicts in Dublin.
  50. Handsome Devil (2016) – A drama set in an Irish boarding school.

The Quiet Man (1952)

Directed by the legendary John Ford and starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara, this romantic comedy-drama tells the story of an American boxer returning to the Irish village of his birth. It’s celebrated for its lush cinematography and authentic depiction of Irish countryside and culture.

Once (2007)

Set in Dublin, this low-budget indie gem is a musical romance that captures the story of a street musician and a Czech immigrant. Their shared love of music leads to a deep, heartfelt connection. The film won an Academy Award for Best Original Song.

My Left Foot (1989)

This biographical drama showcases Daniel Day-Lewis in a powerful performance as Christy Brown, an Irishman born with cerebral palsy who learns to paint and write with his only controllable limb—his left foot. Day-Lewis won an Oscar for this transformative role.

In the Name of the Father (1993)

Another acclaimed Day-Lewis film, this drama tackles the true story of the Guildford Four, wrongly convicted of an IRA bombing. It’s a searing exploration of injustice, family bonds, and the political turmoil of the time.

Angela’s Ashes (1999)

Based on Frank McCourt’s heart-wrenching memoir, this film chronicles the life of a poor Irish family in Limerick, grappling with poverty, alcoholism, and societal constraints.

The Commitments (1991)

Adapted from Roddy Doyle’s novel, this comedy-drama follows the trials and tribulations of a Dublin soul band aiming for stardom. It humorously captures the spirit of working-class Dublin.

The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006)

Set during the Irish War of Independence and the Civil War, this historical drama, directed by Ken Loach, delves into the ideological struggles and personal stories amidst Ireland’s tumultuous political landscape.

Brooklyn (2015)

Starring Saoirse Ronan, this touching period drama depicts the life of an Irish immigrant navigating love and life in 1950s New York while being torn between two worlds.

Michael Collins (1996)

A biographical depiction of the Irish revolutionary leader, played by Liam Neeson. The film captures the passion and complexities of the man instrumental in Ireland’s fight for independence.

Song of the Sea (2014)

A stunning animated fantasy film that takes inspiration from Irish folklore. It tells the tale of a brother and sister embarking on a magical journey to discover their heritage and save the spirit world.

Calvary (2014)

A darkly comedic drama, it follows Father James, played by Brendan Gleeson, through trials that test his faith and morality in a small Irish town. It’s an introspective look at religion, redemption, and personal battles.

The Field (1990)

Richard Harris gives a stellar performance in this drama about an Irish farmer defending his field against an American developer. It’s a powerful exploration of attachment, land rights, and generational legacy.

The Secret of Roan Inish (1994)

A family-friendly drama centered on Irish folklore, specifically the selkie myth. A young girl unravels her family’s history and its ties to the mysterious Roan Inish island.

The Guard (2011)

A black comedy crime film set in the west of Ireland, starring Brendan Gleeson as an unorthodox Irish policeman teaming up with an uptight FBI agent. It’s packed with sharp humor and contrasts cultural dynamics.

Intermission (2003)

A comedic crime drama that revolves around the lives of several characters in Dublin, showcasing love, crime, and chance encounters. Colin Farrell and Cillian Murphy star, weaving through intersecting plots.

Philomena (2013)

Based on true events, this drama follows an elderly Irish woman’s journey, with a journalist’s help, to find her son, who was taken from her decades ago. Judi Dench delivers a poignant performance as Philomena.

The Crying Game (1992)

A drama with themes of love, loyalty, and identity. Set against the backdrop of the Troubles in Northern Ireland, it explores complex relationships and has a notable plot twist.

Ondine (2009)

A romantic drama that combines modern life with Irish myth. A fisherman, played by Colin Farrell, discovers a woman in his fishing net who might be a selkie.

Hunger (2008)

A gripping historical drama about Bobby Sands, the Irish republican who led the 1981 hunger strike in Maze Prison. It’s a raw portrayal of political conviction and personal sacrifice.

Sing Street (2016)

This coming-of-age comedy-drama is set in 1980s Dublin. A teenager forms a rock band to impress a girl, capturing the essence of youth, dreams, and the transformative power of music.

The Magdalene Sisters (2002)

Peter Mullan’s “The Magdalene Sisters” offers a harrowing look at a dark chapter of Irish history. The narrative follows three young women confined to the Magdalene Laundries, institutions run by the Catholic Church that housed “fallen women.” Exposing the brutalities and hypocrisies within, the film is a powerful commentary on oppression, resilience, and the quest for justice.

Into the West (1992)

A family adventure film with elements of fantasy, focusing on two young brothers who embark on a quest to find a magical horse released into the wilds of the west.

Leap Year (2010)

A romantic comedy set in Ireland, where an American woman plans to propose to her boyfriend on Leap Day, following an Irish tradition. But her journey to meet him takes unexpected turns.

The Siege of Jadotville (2016)

A war film that narrates the story of Irish soldiers besieged by Congolese troops in 1961. It’s a tense portrayal of valor under extreme circumstances.

Waking Ned Devine (1998)

A comedic narrative unfolds in a small Irish village after a resident wins the lottery and passes away from the shock. The villagers devise a plan to claim the winnings.

The Lobster (2015)

This dystopian black comedy is set in a world where singles are transformed into animals if they don’t find a partner within 45 days. Filmed in various Irish locations, it’s a quirky commentary on societal norms.

The Snapper (1993)

A comedy based on Roddy Doyle’s novel, it revolves around a young Irish woman’s unexpected pregnancy and her family’s humorous reactions.

A Date for Mad Mary (2016)

A drama that explores the life of “Mad” Mary McArdle as she returns to her hometown after a prison stint, trying to reconnect with her best friend.

Frank (2014)

A comedic drama about an aspiring musician joining an eccentric pop band led by the mysterious and enigmatic Frank, who wears a papier-mâché head.

Evelyn (2002)

Based on true events from the 1950s, it portrays a father’s fight against the Irish courts to regain custody of his children after his wife abandons the family.

Calvary (2014)

This film, directed by John Michael McDonagh, is a compelling tale of sacrifice and redemption. Brendan Gleeson stars as Father James, a good-hearted priest in a small Irish coastal town, who receives a death threat during confession. As the days unfold, Father James interacts with various troubled souls in the community, each a representation of modern challenges to faith. A mix of dark comedy and profound drama, “Calvary” contemplates the complexities of forgiveness and sacrifice in a world filled with pain.

The Field (1990)

Set in the 1930s, “The Field” tells the story of Bull McCabe (Richard Harris) and his obsession with a field he has cultivated for many years. When an American businessman tries to buy it, McCabe’s attachment to the land becomes a symbol for the deep connection between the Irish and their ancestral lands. The story, while addressing themes of tradition vs. modernity and the lengths one will go for love and pride, paints a vivid picture of rural Ireland’s customs and challenges.

The Secret of Roan Inish (1994)

Directed by John Sayles, this film intertwines family storytelling and Irish folklore. Young Fiona, after moving in with her grandparents in a small fishing village, learns about her family’s history and their mysterious ties to the island of Roan Inish. As she delves into the legend of the selkies (seal creatures that can transform into humans), the film becomes a touching meditation on family, heritage, and the power of stories to connect generations.

The Guard (2011)

Amidst the serene landscapes of Galway, “The Guard” is an irreverent comedy interlaced with thrilling crime elements. Brendan Gleeson plays Sergeant Gerry Boyle, an unconventional and politically incorrect policeman. When an FBI agent (Don Cheadle) arrives to investigate an international drug smuggling ring, their interaction brings forth moments of hilarity. This film celebrates the quirks of individuality, and the contrast between local and global law enforcement methods.

Intermission (2003)

“Intermission” dives into the intricacies of urban life in Dublin. With a star-studded cast, including Colin Farrell and Cillian Murphy, the film weaves together various stories of love, loss, and mischief. From a man trying to win back his love, a petty thief planning a heist, to an ambitious TV producer exploiting real-life drama for ratings – the film captures the raw energy and unpredictability of life in a modern city.

Philomena (2013)

A touching tale of loss and discovery, “Philomena” is based on the real-life story of Philomena Lee’s quest to find her son, who she was forced to give up for adoption in the 1950s. With the assistance of a disgraced journalist, played by Steve Coogan, Judi Dench’s Philomena embarks on a journey that unveils dark truths about the Catholic Church in Ireland. It’s a story of unwavering hope, faith, and the insurmountable power of a mother’s love.

The Crying Game (1992)

Director Neil Jordan crafts a mesmerizing narrative that blends romance, drama, and political intrigue. Fergus, an IRA member, becomes involved with the lover of a British soldier he once held captive. The film’s exploration of loyalty, love, and identity is heightened by its unexpected plot twist, challenging viewers’ perceptions on gender and love.

Ondine (2009)

Neil Jordan’s “Ondine” is a whimsical romantic drama that incorporates elements of Irish mythology. Colin Farrell plays Syracuse, a fisherman who nets a mysterious woman named Ondine, igniting rumors of her being a selkie. As Syracuse’s ailing daughter forms a bond with Ondine, the line between myth and reality blurs, creating a magical tale of love and hope.

Hunger (2008)

Steve McQueen’s directorial debut, “Hunger,” is a visceral exploration of the 1981 Irish hunger strike. Michael Fassbender delivers a harrowing performance as Bobby Sands, the strike’s leader. Through minimal dialogue and powerful imagery, the film provides a stark portrayal of the physical and psychological effects of protest and the human spirit’s resilience against oppression.

Sing Street (2016)

Set in the 1980s recession-hit Dublin, “Sing Street” is a heartwarming musical drama directed by John Carney. Following the life of a teenager, Conor, who forms a band to win over a girl, the film becomes a nostalgic tribute to youth, dreams, and the transformative power of music. With catchy original songs and a backdrop of family and school struggles, “Sing Street” celebrates the rebellious spirit of the ’80s.

The Magdalene Sisters (2002)

Directed by Peter Mullan, “The Magdalene Sisters” is a heart-wrenching portrayal of Ireland’s dark history. It follows three young women who, for different reasons, are sent to the Magdalene laundries. These institutions, run by the Catholic Church, subjected many young women to a life of forced labor and abuse, all under the guise of penance and reform. Through the experiences of these three characters, the film sheds light on the oppressive systems and societal norms that allowed such horrors to occur.

Into the West (1992)

“Into the West” offers a magical journey imbued with Irish folklore. Directed by Mike Newell, this family adventure delves into the story of two young brothers from Dublin who embark on a quest to recover a mythical white horse gifted to them by their Traveller grandfather. As the horse is taken to the west of Ireland, the brothers’ pursuit becomes an exploration of love, loss, and the ties that bind us to our roots.

Leap Year (2010)

Romantic comedies and Ireland’s enchanting landscape seem like a match made in cinematic heaven. “Leap Year,” directed by Anand Tucker, tells the story of Anna, an American woman, played by Amy Adams, determined to propose to her boyfriend in Dublin on Leap Day, an old Irish tradition. However, her journey takes her off the beaten path, leading to unexpected encounters and reevaluations. It’s a heartwarming film about love, traditions, and the unpredictable nature of life.

The Siege of Jadotville (2016)

A gripping war film, “The Siege of Jadotville” recounts the true story of the 1961 siege of a 150-strong Irish UN battalion under Commander Patrick Quinlan by 3,000 Congolese troops. Directed by Richie Smyth, the film highlights the valiant efforts of these Irish soldiers who stood their ground despite overwhelming odds. It’s a tale of valor, duty, and the political complexities of war.

Waking Ned Devine (1998)

Set in a quaint Irish village, “Waking Ned Devine” is a delightful comedy that revolves around the chaos that ensues after a resident wins the lottery and then dies from the shock. Directed by Kirk Jones, the village’s quirky inhabitants devise an elaborate plan to claim the winnings. Through humor and heart, the film showcases the close-knit ties of a community and the lengths they’ll go for fortune and friendship.

The Lobster (2015)

Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Lobster” offers a satirical look at modern love and societal norms. Filmed in various parts of Ireland, it’s set in a dystopian world where singles are taken to a hotel and given 45 days to find a romantic partner or be turned into animals. Starring Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz, the film is a darkly comedic exploration of conformity, individuality, and the inherent absurdities of human relationships.

The Snapper (1993)

Based on Roddy Doyle’s celebrated novel, “The Snapper” offers a hilarious yet heartfelt glimpse into working-class Dublin. Directed by Stephen Frears, the story follows the Rabbitte family, particularly the eldest daughter Sharon, as she navigates an unexpected pregnancy. Through humor and genuine emotion, the film captures the spirit of community, the intricacies of family dynamics, and the challenges and joys of unexpected surprises.

A Date for Mad Mary (2016)

Darren Thornton’s “A Date for Mad Mary” is a poignant exploration of friendship, love, and self-discovery. Fresh out of prison, ‘Mad’ Mary McArdle is trying to fit back into her old life and prepare for her best friend’s wedding. However, her personal transformation and search for a date lead to unexpected revelations. It’s a touching narrative that delves deep into the complexities of human relationships.

Frank (2014)

Directed by Lenny Abrahamson, “Frank” is a quirky comedy-drama about an aspiring musician who joins an eccentric band led by Frank, a mysterious individual who wears a giant papier-mâché head. As they embark on a journey to record an album, the film becomes an exploration of art, mental health, and the thin line between genius and madness.

Evelyn (2002)

“Evelyn,” directed by Bruce Beresford, is based on the real-life story of Desmond Doyle and his fight against the Irish courts in the 1950s. After his wife abandons their family, Desmond loses custody of his children to the state. The film chronicles his heart-wrenching battle to reunite with his children, highlighting the flaws in the legal system and the power of perseverance.

In the Name of the Father (1993)

Directed by Jim Sheridan, this powerful drama tells the real-life story of the Guildford Four, particularly focusing on Gerry Conlon’s experience. Played by Daniel Day-Lewis, Conlon is falsely accused of an IRA bombing in England and is imprisoned along with his father. The film unflinchingly showcases the miscarriage of justice, the strains on father-son relationships, and the determination to prove one’s innocence.

Once (2007)

This modern-day musical, helmed by John Carney, is set against the backdrop of bustling Dublin streets. The story follows a busker and an immigrant who bond over their shared love for music. As they collaborate and craft heartwarming tunes, their personal tales of love, heartbreak, and dreams unfold. “Once” captures the magic of fleeting connections and the lasting impact of music.

The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2006)

Directed by Ken Loach, this historical drama delves deep into the Irish War of Independence and the Civil War that followed. It traces the journey of two brothers, played by Cillian Murphy and Padraic Delaney, who find themselves on opposing sides due to their differing ideologies. The film masterfully captures the emotional and political turmoil of a nation fighting for freedom.

My Left Foot (1989)

Another collaboration between Jim Sheridan and Daniel Day-Lewis, “My Left Foot” is the poignant biography of Christy Brown. Born with cerebral palsy in a working-class Dublin family, Brown overcomes tremendous odds to become an accomplished writer and painter using only his left foot. The film is a testament to the indomitable human spirit and the power of determination.

Song of the Sea (2014)

This enchanting animated feature, directed by Tomm Moore, draws inspiration from Irish folklore about selkies. It follows siblings Ben and Saoirse on a quest to save the spirit world and discover their own magical heritage. With its beautifully hand-drawn animation and poignant narrative, “Song of the Sea” celebrates the magic of tales passed down through generations.

Brooklyn (2015)

Based on Colm Tóibín’s novel and directed by John Crowley, “Brooklyn” paints the emotional journey of Eilis Lacey, an Irish immigrant in 1950s New York. As Eilis tries to adjust to her new life, she’s torn between her newfound love and the ties to her homeland. Saoirse Ronan’s compelling performance captures the essence of longing, love, and self-discovery.

The Commitments (1991)

Adapted from Roddy Doyle’s novel, this musical comedy-drama directed by Alan Parker offers a lively look at a group of Dubliners who form a soul band. As they navigate challenges and clash over egos, the film encapsulates the ups and downs of pursuing dreams. “The Commitments” stands out for its raw energy, humor, and unforgettable musical performances.

Darby O’Gill and the Little People (1959)

A classic from Walt Disney, this fantasy film directed by Robert Stevenson centers around the wily Darby O’Gill and his encounters with leprechauns and the magical realm. With its mix of adventure, humor, and Irish folklore, it offers a delightful and nostalgic experience for audiences young and old.

The Quiet Man (1952)

Helmed by John Ford and starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara, “The Quiet Man” is a romantic comedy-drama set in the Irish countryside. The story revolves around Sean Thornton, an American boxer who returns to his ancestral home and falls in love with the fiery Mary Kate Danaher. Beyond the romance, the film offers a picturesque view of Ireland and insights into its customs and community dynamics.

High Spirits (1988)

Directed by Neil Jordan, this comedic fantasy film is set in a haunted Irish castle turned hotel. When an American businessman plans to exploit the ghostly inhabitants for profit, love and chaos ensue. With a cast led by Peter O’Toole, Daryl Hannah, and Steve Guttenberg, “High Spirits” serves up laughter with a dash of spectral romance.

Angela’s Ashes (1999)

Directed by Alan Parker and based on Frank McCourt’s memoir, “Angela’s Ashes” is a deeply moving portrayal of a young boy’s life in Limerick, Ireland, during the Great Depression. Despite the abject poverty and challenges that his family faces, young Frank’s spirit and determination shine through. The film is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit and the power of memories.

Calvary (2014)

John Michael McDonagh’s “Calvary” is a darkly comedic drama centered around Father James, played brilliantly by Brendan Gleeson. Set in a small Irish town, the story kicks off with an unknown man confessing to the priest his intent to kill him in a week’s time. The ensuing days see Father James reflecting on faith, morality, and the nature of good and evil amidst a myriad of eccentric townsfolk.

Philomena (2013)

Helmed by Stephen Frears, “Philomena” recounts the true story of Philomena Lee’s search for her son who was taken away from her decades ago when she was forced to live in a convent. Played by Judi Dench, Philomena’s journey is heart-wrenching yet uplifting, emphasizing the power of forgiveness and the unbreakable bond between a mother and child.

Ondine (2009)

Directed by Neil Jordan, “Ondine” is a lyrical fairy tale set in an Irish coastal town. It tells the story of a fisherman, played by Colin Farrell, who catches a mysterious woman in his fishing nets. As she becomes part of his world, old legends intertwine with the complexities of modern life. The film beautifully juxtaposes myth with reality, offering a unique cinematic experience.

The Secret of Roan Inish (1994)

This family drama, directed by John Sayles, delves into the Irish legend of selkies — seals that can become human. The story follows a young girl named Fiona, who is sent to live with her grandparents and learns about her family’s mysterious history connected to the nearby island of Roan Inish. With its magical storytelling and captivating visuals, the film is a celebration of folklore and family ties.

Disco Pigs (2001)

Kirsten Sheridan’s “Disco Pigs” is a coming-of-age story that revolves around two teenagers, Pig and Runt, who share an intensely close bond since birth. Set in Cork, their world is one of rebellion and shared fantasies, but as adulthood approaches, their bond is tested. The film poignantly captures the pains of growing up and the inevitability of change.

The Field (1990)

Helmed by Jim Sheridan, “The Field” is set in the 1930s and revolves around “Bull” McCabe, a hardened Irish farmer who has spent years cultivating a rented field. When the land is put up for auction, he sees it as his by right. The ensuing conflict over land ownership exposes deeper issues related to identity, heritage, and the lengths one will go to protect what they cherish.

Grabbers (2012)

A delightful blend of horror, comedy, and sci-fi, “Grabbers” directed by Jon Wright, is set in a quiet fishing village off the coast of Ireland. When blood-sucking sea creatures start attacking the locals, the village discovers that being drunk is the only way to stay safe. The film offers a unique mix of thrills and laughs, setting it apart from typical creature features.

Breakfast on Pluto (2005)

Neil Jordan’s “Breakfast on Pluto” is a vibrant tale of a young trans woman’s journey from a small Irish town to the bustling streets of London. Set against the backdrop of the 1970s, the film, starring Cillian Murphy, deals with themes of identity, love, and the quest for belonging. It’s a heartwarming narrative that emphasizes the importance of self-acceptance and the pursuit of happiness.

The Guard (2011)

A crime-comedy directed by John Michael McDonagh, “The Guard” stars Brendan Gleeson as Sergeant Gerry Boyle, an unorthodox Irish policeman. When a straight-laced FBI agent, played by Don Cheadle, arrives to investigate drug trafficking, the two form an unlikely partnership. With its sharp wit, memorable characters, and intriguing plot twists, the film is both a thrilling police procedural and a hilarious comedy.

War of the Buttons (1994)

Directed by John Roberts, this film is a charming take on childhood rivalries. Set in the Irish countryside, it pits two groups of schoolboys from neighboring villages against each other. Their playful battles escalate as they attempt to cut off the buttons from the clothes of their captured rivals. “War of the Buttons” is a heartwarming exploration of innocence, friendship, and the age-old adage that it’s not the size of the dog in the fight but the size of the fight in the dog.

Irish Actors

Ireland has produced a plethora of talented actors who have graced both the silver screen and the stages of theaters worldwide. Some of the most renowned Irish actors include Daniel Day-Lewis, Saoirse Ronan, Colin Farrell, Cillian Murphy, and Brendan Gleeson, among others. They’ve often brought a touch of Irish charm, depth, and complexity to their diverse roles, ranging from historical figures to fictional characters.

Is there a film industry in Ireland?

Yes, there is a significant film industry in Ireland. Over the years, the Irish film industry has grown and garnered international acclaim, producing both homegrown films and hosting international productions. Institutions like the Irish Film Board (now called Screen Ireland) actively promote and support Irish filmmakers. The country’s rich history, picturesque landscapes, and talented actors have made it a desirable location for shooting and production. Renowned Irish films include “The Commitments,” “My Left Foot,” “Once,” and “The Wind That Shakes the Barley,” among others.

Was any of Harry Potter filmed in Ireland?

While much of the “Harry Potter” series was filmed in the UK, particularly at Leavesden Studios near London and various locations in Scotland and England, there were no primary filming locations for the series in Ireland. Some of the scenes in the Half blood prince were filled on the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare.

What blockbuster was filmed in Ireland?

Several blockbuster films have been shot in Ireland, leveraging the country’s diverse and scenic landscapes. One of the most notable blockbusters filmed in parts of Ireland is “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and its sequel “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” The iconic scenes featuring the character Luke Skywalker on a secluded island were shot on Skellig Michael, a remote island off the coast of County Kerry. This location provided the perfect setting for the ancient Jedi temple and added a touch of mysticism and untouched beauty to the Star Wars saga.

Some of the battle scenes from Saving Private Ryan were also fimed in Ireland.

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